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Roots of Racism – Updated

I’m Richard Lloyd Jones and this is Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head. Well, you don’t have to look far these days, do you, to find signs of sickness. A young girl is stoned in Brazil by evangelical fanatics as she’s on the way to a Candomble church. Boo Haram slaughtering Nigerians in an endeavor to create its own state. And now, 9 people dead in Charleston, S.C. after a gunman opened fire on a prayer meeting.

Isn’t it hard to know what to say, beyond the normal words of sorrow and sadness? We lament the seeming deterioration in humanity and civilization but horrifyingly seem at a complete loss as to what to do about it. Obama called on Martin Luther King’s words when King stated the need to question the system, the way of life, the philosophy which produces the murderers.

But we seem unable to collectively embark on that. It seems really that a piece is missing from our understanding of the human being and his society. Well, I believe that missing link is here in Norberto Keppe‘s science of Analytical Trilogy.

The Roots of Racism Updated, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Posted by on June 19, 2015 in Uncategorized

 

Going Beyond the Dogmas of Science

Dogma. A principle or set of principles laid down by an authority as incontrovertibly true. Meaning incapable of being questioned or doubted. In the 15 and 1600s, there was the beginning of a movement against dogma that burst forth from the scientific studies of such giants as Copernicus and Keppler, Newton and Galileo. Names we know well, even if we understand little of their proposals.

But this much we can understand: the scientists of the time were engaged in replacing untestable dogmas with scientific scrutiny and experimentation.

The dogmas they were opposing, or course, were from the religious institutions of the time. Large and powerful churches not opposed to burning or drowning those who disagreed with them. Scientific experimentation, then, was a good thing that helped move us from superstition and irrationality.

But there is a danger as well when experimental science is elaborated independently from the knowledge that was available in the past. It creates another intransigent dogma. We’ll go beyond the dogmas of modern science, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Posted by on February 9, 2015 in Uncategorized

 

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The Sanity of Interiorizing our Lives

Welcome to Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head. Carl Gustav Jung proposed that everything that irritates us about others can lead us to understand ourselves. For him, others were a giant mirror into our own psyches. The great German writer, Hermann Hesse, suggested that disliking something in another is disliking something that we have, too.

Freud, Kraepelin, Schopenhauer, those Germans opened the door to our psychological lies. And it was a shock at the time. Jung joked to Freud on their maiden journey to America that they were bringing the plague to American. And if you subscribe to the idea that hell comes from the others, as Sartre proposed, it is a little depressing to have to let go of that and point the finger back inside for the real source of our problems.

The consequences, however, of maintaining that outward blame are severe. From nuking plants with toxic chemicals to ethnic cleansing to executing the “evil” ones, we pay a big price for our naive exteriorization. 

Let’s go the other way. The Sanity of Interiorizing our Lives, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Posted by on November 6, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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Fathers of our Inverted Science, part 2

Our thinking, our philosophies of life, these are things we take for granted most of the time. “That’s just the way it is,” we say, and we step out confidently upon that premise. But what extensive research in clinical study from Brazil is showing us is that we would do well to investigate a little deeper. Our thinking, as it turns out, is not always our own.

I’m Richard Lloyd Jones, and today in Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head, Fathers of our Inverted Science, part 2.

Last time on our program, Cesar Soós and I began our discussion about the leading thinkers who have had such an impact on our human civilization. And how their mistakes have led us collectively to the mess our modern society finds itself in today. We talked about Aristotle’s monumental error of placing the senses as the determiner of knowledge.

“Nothing comes to the mind which doesn’t pass first through the senses,” he asserted, thereby enshrining sensory, positivistic science as the lord of the domain.

Aristotle’s ideas were resisted for a few centuries, particularly by Augustine, who leaned more towards Plato’s universality, and Anselm. But Aquinas, the great medieval theologian, brought Aristotle back to the forefront, and the battle was on. Francis Bacon, Descartes, Comte followed, and science changed from considering more metaphysical explanations for the origin of things to seeing all phenomena only in terms of their physical characteristics. Left in the wake as well were the moral or theological tenets of science, which thus became strictly materialistic. The Big Bang, the search for the particles that cause gravity or even intelligence and creativity, the destruction of material nature to get energy – all are consequences of this academic difference of opinion.

Right away, we see that philosophy and theology have dramatically influenced science, which does not come solely from experimentation at all, as scientists would have us believe.

Dr. Norberto Keppe‘s Analytical Trilogy is a more advanced science because it accepts the important discoveries and truths from philosophy and theology in its scientific postulates. Dr. Keppe was telling a group of us recently that Analytical Trilogy is a science that accepts and integrates what’s true from all fields. And this is possible because of two things: Keppe’s establishing of a true metaphysics on which to base an analysis of anything, and Keppe’s clarification of what’s going on in the human psyche, which causes us to misinterpret reality and put many inverted ideas into our theories.

This is no small thing, and difficult to explain in entirety, so I encourage you to read Keppe’s work to get a fuller view. Our portal at trilogia.ws will lead you in some interesting directions, and of course, I’m always available to steer you in the right direction at rich@richjonesvoice.com.

On our last program, we showed how Freud and Darwin made crucial errors that have led society and science in the wrong direction totally. Today, I continue my fascinating discussion with Cesar Soós … part 2 of Fathers of the Lie.

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Posted by on October 15, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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Aside

The truth will set you free, it is written.

OK, good. But knowing what the truth is, recognizing it when it pulls up alongside, ah, that’s a little more difficult. Especially as our materialistic worldview would tell us that truth depends. And this idea of relative truth is a lie that comes to us from somebody else’s head.

Today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head, the Fathers of the Lie.

If you’ve been tuned in to our program for awhile now, you’ll know that we’re based on the science of Analytical Trilogy, which is trilogical because of its union of philosophy, science and spirituality. And this spiritual part is an important aspect of science that was for all intents and purposes cut out of scientific consideration with the rise of positivistic science in the middle of the 19th century.

Auguste Comte, the father of Positivism, talked about the quest for truth going through 3 phases, with the theological being the first or, we could say, most primitive. The philosophical phase would be next, and the positivist the last, meaning the most mature. And this last phase states that we know the most when we base ourselves on actual sense experience.

Right away, we can find some flaws with this view in that we know many things without having experience. Recent studies at Yale and Berkley suggest that little babies have working knowledge of basic arithmetic and physics principles as well as a well developed moral sense. And all of this with with no previous sensory experience.

So, linking all our societal development to positivistic science bases us not on something superior, but inferior. And we desperately need the amalgamation again of science with philosophy and theology or spirituality, which is precisely what Keppe’s work of Analytical Trilogy does.

More about this expansive work can be found at our Trilogy portal, or write me by email for more information or observations or questions. Always great to hear from you.

Our program today will be the first of two parts exploring how the inferior sensory-based science got so entrenched in our academic institutions – and our society in general. It’s the result of a great lie perpetrated and followed by many great thinkers who were fooled into following the lie. And that lie has been inspired by the supreme liar in the Universe – Lucifer. And that’s why reintroducing the 5000-year wisdom from Judeo-Christian theology is so important. Keppe knows this, and that’s why I consider his science to be the most important science to be studied in the world today.

Cesar Soós, one of our great Keppean metaphysics scholars at the International Society of Analytical Trilogy, is my guest today for the first part of Fathers of the Lie.

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Fathers of our Inverted Science, part 1

 
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Posted by on October 2, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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The Limitations of Selfishness

We are clearly living in a time of veneration of the individual in western society. In North America, it’s part of our mythology. The strong, independent, self-sufficient person is admired, and you see this reinforced in every area. Paul Simon sang about being a rock, an island against all the rest. The Marlboro Man squints against the sun, confident in his capacity to tame that stallion and build that barn single-handed. Rambo wins the Vietnam War all on his own.

Anything that deep in our psyche commands there unchallenged. There’s no option to consider since all other options get dismissed even before we really entertain them. We might flirt with alternatives like socialism and collectivism, but only when we’re young and impressed by challenging the status quo.

Individualism – one man, one vote – the democracy of individual rights, obviously has its place as a worldview to govern our lives. But it can stimulate neurosis and even backwardness if not analyzed.

The Limitation of Selfishness, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Posted by on September 5, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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The Scandal of Drugs

We’ve seen a lot of good ones go way too early because of drugs, haven’t we? Seemed like a new one a week back in the ’60s and ’70s. Janis and Jimmy. Then Elvis. Now Whitney and Amy.

In Brazil, too, some great ones exited early thanks to substance abuse. Elis Regina, Tom Jobim, Tim Maya. Those are the high profile ones, and reams have been written and spoken about them and the problem. Can there possibly be anything new to say? Without preaching or proselytizing, of course. Both the moral finger wagging of the right and the societal condemnation of the left seem wholly inadequate to provide any healing at all.

And the situation’s not improving much. Easy access to drugs, more desperation and tough times, materialism and lack of spiritual connection – it’s a fatal recipe for increasing abuse.
Well, I am of the mind that a deeper analysis of our entire modern mindset is in order, and this is our proposal on this show. So, let’s tackle the Scandal of Drugs, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Posted by on August 29, 2014 in Uncategorized

 
 
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