Under Control of Evil

I’m Richard Lloyd Jones, and this is Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

In Shakespeare’s The Tempest, Ferdinand, in desperation at the terrible plight of ship and crew, cries out, “Hell is empty and all the devils are here!”

And looking around at our situation today, it wouldn’t be difficult to reach the same conclusion. Except that our modern materialistic science doesn’t allow for that conclusion. Oh, we might utter the words, but I doubt most of us would use words like “hell” and “devils” in anything more than an illustrative sense. We almost certainly wouldn’t mean them literally.

But there is a very modern science emerging here in Brazil that does consider the power of spiritual influence to inspire the human being – both for good or for evil. And yes, I do mean a science. And what the scientist responsible for this view, Dr. Norberto Keppe, maintains is that the evil is winning as long as we don’t have more consciousness of it. That means, reuniting theology and philosophy again with exact science, as used to be the case. So we can really understand our situation.

Under Control of Evil, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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The Energy of Virtue

Welcome to Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head, I’m Richard Lloyd Jones. A couple of thousand years ago, a consideration of virtue was part of everyday, common discourse. The Greeks gave considerable attention to virtue, culminating in Aristotle’s influential writings on moral and intellectual virtues. Before him, Confucius proposed personal virtue as the way to a good life. The Bible has hundreds of passages about the importance of virtue.

Today, public discourse is muted, and people lament the loss of the byproducts of virtue, like falling self-discipline and rising selfishness.

Not to mention the rampant corruption at all levels of modern society that makes us fear that virtue is, in fact, long gone. As a small indicator of this, a graph of the frequency of words occurring in books over time shows a rapid rise of the word “technology” in the past 40 years against a two-century slide in virtue.

In Norberto Keppe‘s Integral Psychoanalysis, though, virtue is essential for a healthy human being and society. So we’d like to go against the grain!

The Energy of Virtue, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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True Co-Creation

I’m Richard Lloyd Jones, and this is Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

I was walking down the streets of Vancouver a number of years ago after I’d been living away from the west coast for some time, and I bumped into an old acquaintance of mine in Kitsilano, the old hippy neighbourhood in the ’70s.

“What are you doing these days?” I asked her. “Channeling yoga,” came back the straight-faced reply.

Well, she was always a little out there, but it leads into what I wanted to talk about today. The field of spiritual growth has exploded over the past 50 years, maybe beginning with the Beatles and their Maharishi experience in India in the ’60s. But it’s a market with a lot of choices. From the more traditional, like church and prayer, to the more trendy, like Buddhism and meditation, to the downright weird, like, well, channeling yoga.

What to make of it all? In Dr. Norberto Keppe‘s Analytical Trilogy, he’s united theology back into science to give us a more wholistic view. And that means some universal principles. True Co-Creation, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Towards a Universal Mentality

I’m Richard Lloyd Jones, and this is Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head. 

In light of the Paris attacks in November of 2015, it’s difficult to know the best thing to do. The French government, seemingly wanting to show off those decisive decision-making muscles so vaunted in our no nonsense, zero tolerance, “let’s show ’em who’s boss” business model of a society, wasted no time in declaring war.

Most of our western world commiserated concernedly and gave their approval.

Donald Trump said the French need more guns.

It’s oh-so-easy to react in kind in this world. Far too simple to hit back when we’ve been violated, to see red and demand hard justice. That response we know well. From Travis Bickle’s “You talkin’ to me”, to Dirty Harry’s “Go ahead. Make my day” snarl, the world’s full of these modern archetypes. Guys who don’t back down, men and women who make sure they get even.

But is this the best response if we want to resolve this? Will this “brutality to match brutality” move us forward? Seems to me we need a different response. Something we can find in Norberto Keppe‘s science of Analytical Trilogy.

Towards a Universal Mentality, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Healing Terrorism

I’m Richard Lloyd Jones and this is Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head. I moved to Brazil from New York in 2001, 2 1/2 months before 9/11.

Talk about timing.

But if it was timing, it was not anything conscious. My desire was to learn more about the work of an extraordinary scientist I’d become aware of a short time before moving here.

That scientist was Dr. Norberto Keppe. What Keppe proposes in his far-reaching science is, quite simply, a solution to the fundamental human problem, which is that we act in contradiction to our essence and, therefore, we act against life. This goes to the root of the issue. This Inversion is the cause of all our conflicts and crises today, so it’s not a matter simply of protecting this or that species or saving this or that ecosystem or cutting our greenhouse gasses or resolving geo-political scheming. We’re going to have to change virtually everything if we are to attain the well-being that we have a right to enjoy. The transformation must be basic. It must be total.

Today, we’ll try to transform and transcend the mounting terrorism crisis on our planet.

Healing Terrorism, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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The Sanity of Interiorizing our Lives

Welcome to Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head. Carl Gustav Jung proposed that everything that irritates us about others can lead us to understand ourselves. For him, others were a giant mirror into our own psyches. The great German writer, Hermann Hesse, suggested that disliking something in another is disliking something that we have, too.

Freud, Kraepelin, Schopenhauer, those Germans opened the door to our psychological lies. And it was a shock at the time. Jung joked to Freud on their maiden journey to America that they were bringing the plague to American. And if you subscribe to the idea that hell comes from the others, as Sartre proposed, it is a little depressing to have to let go of that and point the finger back inside for the real source of our problems.

The consequences, however, of maintaining that outward blame are severe. From nuking plants with toxic chemicals to ethnic cleansing to executing the “evil” ones, we pay a big price for our naive exteriorization. 

Let’s go the other way. The Sanity of Interiorizing our Lives, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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The Limitations of Selfishness

We are clearly living in a time of veneration of the individual in western society. In North America, it’s part of our mythology. The strong, independent, self-sufficient person is admired, and you see this reinforced in every area. Paul Simon sang about being a rock, an island against all the rest. The Marlboro Man squints against the sun, confident in his capacity to tame that stallion and build that barn single-handed. Rambo wins the Vietnam War all on his own.

Anything that deep in our psyche commands there unchallenged. There’s no option to consider since all other options get dismissed even before we really entertain them. We might flirt with alternatives like socialism and collectivism, but only when we’re young and impressed by challenging the status quo.

Individualism – one man, one vote – the democracy of individual rights, obviously has its place as a worldview to govern our lives. But it can stimulate neurosis and even backwardness if not analyzed.

The Limitation of Selfishness, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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