Power and Demonic Envy

In Norberto Keppe‘s extraordinary book, Liberation of the People, he writes, “Humankind reckons among its numbers a few individuals who are completely sick. This includes those who have succeeded in attaining positions of social power.” That’s why the subtitle of his book is the Pathology of Power.

He wrote that in 1984 – a good year for books like that as Orwell prophesized. But surprisingly, no one has really picked up the torch and continued that analysis. No, most explorations or powerful people are somehow in awe of their accomplishments, failing to see the pathology behind their ascent to power. They point out the wrinkles but miss the rot underneath.

Keppe, now in his ’90s continues to work to make us conscious that we are driven by the sickest among us, who form secret societies and influence the social structure to serve their needs rather than the people. It’s a study that he has called sociopathology, which treats the social difficulties wherein the human being becomes a victim of a sick society.

Power and Demonic Envy, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Dark Spirituality and Victimization

I’m Richard Lloyd Jones and this is Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

We’re just out of the Easter period and some reflections. It was a tough week for the faithful. The burning of Notre Dame striking hard in that major center of Christian faith for 800 something years. And then the bombs exploding in Christian churches and popular hotels in Sri Lanka on Easter Sunday, apparently in retaliation for those terrible attacks on mosques in New Zealand back in March.

Does this hit you at all? Maybe it all seems so far away, right? After all, there are bills to pay and potholes to fix and renovations to do right here in our own daily worlds. Like, who’s got time for another act of terrorism or environmental disaster or burning building?

It’s difficult to put the pieces together. And the media smotherage brings us constant updates of facts and pictures, additional images and numbers that expand exponentially and overwhelm our capacity to filter and understand. Seems we’re poor human ruins tottering over the grave, as Blake described it. Testing times.

Dark Spirituality and Victimization, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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A Study of Temptation

I’m Richard Lloyd Jones, and this is Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

Temptation. Like most religious words, that one’s been banalized and reduced from its original meaning. It means literally a trial or a test. A moment in your life when you have a choice to be faithful or not.

Today, that’s like faith to a diet or a spouse, to a virtue or an ideal. But the original sense was to be tested in your faith to God. Something Job-ian – no matter what life throws at you, you stay the course.

But temptation is secondarily related to allurement or seduction to sin. And here we’re into a less popular usage. Nobody likes to think in terms of “can’t” or “don’t” anymore, do they? “Who says I can’t?”, goes the language of modernity. “Who are you to tell me what’s right and what’s wrong?”

These are tricky waters. “You can’t do that!” has been used to control and restrict by those wanting to remain in power, for sure. But is there something to this obligation aspect of temptation that deserves a more careful consideration?

A Study of Temptation, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Seduction by Evil

“The idea of being a victim of evil is quite a comfortable one,” writes Norberto Keppe in his book, Psychotherapy and Exorcism. “But what’s really going on,” he continues, “is that the human being actually selects the type of evil he wants in his life.”

Well, that’s sobering. I hope this happens unconsciously because the conscious choice for evil seems rather terrifying. Keppe’s view that we summon evil contradicts the common idea that we are victimised by it. Even the exorcists, those most graphic of illustrations of possession by evil, show the possessed as being unwilling recipients of the accursed spiritual invasions.

What Keppe is trying to alert us to here is the very real presence of evil spirits in the human experience, and our considerable role in giving them so much freedom to run amok on our planet.

But there’s another aspect at play in this process … the subterfuge of the demons. And that’s not a once-in-awhile thing. It’s constant.

Seduction by Evil, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Certainty of the Divine

I’m Richard Lloyd Jones and this is Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

A belief in immaculate conception, overcoming death with resurrection, divine miracles of creation … modern thinkers complain these tenets suffer from a lack of evidence. “Faith is a great evil,” they say, “That leads gullible human beings to open their minds so much their brains fall out.”

I respectfully disagree. Faith has been shown in studies to mitigate symptoms of depression, spiritual beliefs can help us deal with loss, disease and death, and even aid recovery. We also know that it helps deal with addictions. Great things have been accomplished with perseverance in the face of impossible odds, even at the risk of loss of life, and what is that if not an act of faith?

So just dismissing conviction in something divine simply because there’s not scientific proof seems unintelligent to me. And anyway, if we just look around us at the intricate design of nature, the complex way natural processes mesh together perfectly, we really have to be slightly moronic to rule out divinity.

The Certainty of the Divine, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Under Control of Evil

I’m Richard Lloyd Jones, and this is Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

In Shakespeare’s The Tempest, Ferdinand, in desperation at the terrible plight of ship and crew, cries out, “Hell is empty and all the devils are here!”

And looking around at our situation today, it wouldn’t be difficult to reach the same conclusion. Except that our modern materialistic science doesn’t allow for that conclusion. Oh, we might utter the words, but I doubt most of us would use words like “hell” and “devils” in anything more than an illustrative sense. We almost certainly wouldn’t mean them literally.

But there is a very modern science emerging here in Brazil that does consider the power of spiritual influence to inspire the human being – both for good or for evil. And yes, I do mean a science. And what the scientist responsible for this view, Dr. Norberto Keppe, maintains is that the evil is winning as long as we don’t have more consciousness of it. That means, reuniting theology and philosophy again with exact science, as used to be the case. So we can really understand our situation.

Under Control of Evil, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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The Energy of Virtue

Welcome to Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head, I’m Richard Lloyd Jones. A couple of thousand years ago, a consideration of virtue was part of everyday, common discourse. The Greeks gave considerable attention to virtue, culminating in Aristotle’s influential writings on moral and intellectual virtues. Before him, Confucius proposed personal virtue as the way to a good life. The Bible has hundreds of passages about the importance of virtue.

Today, public discourse is muted, and people lament the loss of the byproducts of virtue, like falling self-discipline and rising selfishness.

Not to mention the rampant corruption at all levels of modern society that makes us fear that virtue is, in fact, long gone. As a small indicator of this, a graph of the frequency of words occurring in books over time shows a rapid rise of the word “technology” in the past 40 years against a two-century slide in virtue.

In Norberto Keppe‘s Integral Psychoanalysis, though, virtue is essential for a healthy human being and society. So we’d like to go against the grain!

The Energy of Virtue, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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