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Peeking Behind the Curtains of Power

Ever since Dorothy pulled back the curtain to reveal a perfectly ordinary Wizard of Oz manipulating switches to make him seem more powerful, the image has served to portray a reality. Somewhere, in the shadows in not behind an actual curtain, unseen forces are in control.

Perhaps when they are officially unmasked, they will show themselves to be as feeble and full of bluster as the wizard from Frank Baum’s classic, but while they stay hidden they exert enormous influence, as the Wizard of Oz did actually – until Dorothy blew his cover.

The Bilderbergers, the Illuminati, the Elders of Zion – most of use have no idea what goes on in their closed meetings. Or even if some of them actually exist. This ground is ripe for the wildest imaginings of the most paranoid of conspiracy theorists, but it would be foolish to dismiss the central idea out of hand – that our world is really controlled by individuals we seldom see.

It’s a nefarious world of secret influence and elite privilege that survives only on deceit.

Peeking Behind the Curtains of Power, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Posted by on July 10, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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Recovering True Humanity

 I’m Richard Lloyd Jones, and this is Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head. 

With so much tension and confusion in  modern day life, it seems appropriate to do our show,  which deals so directly with the core issues  of human existence. In fact, perhaps any of us who don’t feel deeply disturbed by our situation are dangerously alienated or excessively cold-hearted. That would appear to be the case with the power structure that governs our affairs today.

Norberto Keppe, whose science of Analytical Trilogy underpins our show, considers that the way power is being used today to be the biggest problem facing us.  We live in a world dominated by the pathology of power, which is even more responsible for our modern crises than our individual problems.  Still, we condone this abuse by not learning more about it and by following it. Ignorance is no excuse, and we must become smarter about psycho-socio pathology, the purpose of our show today. 

Recovering True Humanity today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Posted by on June 12, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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Recapturing the Flavor of Romance

Like so many words, romance has been banalized in western culture. Coming to a head in what we now know as medieval chivalry, it’s become associated with more mundane items today, like chocolate and Valentine’s cards. Those medieval tales talked of chivalric adventure and didn’t combine the idea of love until late into the 17th century.

Romance, then, has something to do with flowers and candlelight dinners, but much more to do with tilting at windmills it appears. And it is in this latter sense that we embark on our adventure today.

And like words such as service and humility and reverence, this definition of romance can seem a little fuddy duddy in our hip and flip era where nothing is sacred and all is looked at with a jaundiced eyes from our position of bitchin’ awesomeness.

But romance is anything but lame. And nowhere near as anachronistic as modern society would like to believe. Let’s go a little deeper into romance today.

Recapturing the Flavor of Romance, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Posted by on May 27, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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Losing our Religion

A reading of modern scientific and philosophical thought can be unnverving. Human beings, goes this materialistic scientific view, are the product of causes that are accidental and purposeless. All individual achievements are destined to extinction in the vast entropy of a universe relentlessly bound for ruin.

We are nothing but gigantic lumbering robots built by our genes as survival machines, asserts Richard Dawkins, a leading proponent of this modernist stance.

And I’m not exaggerating the bleakness. Reading Dawkins or geneticist Steve Jones (no relation) or philosopher Bertrand Russell is a depressing journey that reduces Man’s greatest imaginings to the garbage heap of cold, unforgiving material forces that care not a whit for such romantic notions as hopes and ideals.

It’s all so very modern. No good and evil, no confusing purpose, just relentless survival over incomprehensible time periods.

Maybe there’s something missing in it.

Losing our Religion, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Posted by on May 22, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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The Tyranny of Cool

I’m Richard Lloyd Jones, and this is Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

Ask them about what’s important to them and they’ll counter your enthusiasm with a shrug and a mumbled, “I don’t know.” Somewhere between kid-dom and adolescence, your child stops asking sweek, inquisitive questions and starts acting like everything you care about and they used to care about is now completely useless.

I know, I’m dangerously close to sounding like every other person from the older generation here, lamenting the lost younger generation. But I’m going to go out on a limb and propose that really, today, something is different with our teenagers.

Maybe it’s just a matter of degree … I was pretty obsessed with being cool in my teenage years as well … but we have to be open to the possibility that the decay we see in all areas of our planetary experience has spilled over into our young people.

And I don’t mean just that difficult teenage time when rebeliousness seems a rite of passage. Of course, there are extraordinary and idealistic young people, dedicated and talented. But there’s a lot of decadence, too. Let’s try to understand it better today.

They Tyranny of Cool, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Posted by on April 11, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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Our Inverted Contra-Ego

I’m Richard Lloyd Jones, and this is Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

It was part of the psychic apparatus defined in Freud‘s Structural Model of the Psyche. Its role was to mediate between the desires of our uncoordinated instinctual tendencies – the ID – and our critical moralizing part called the Super-Ego.

For Freud, our Ego – caught between these two forces, has a heck of a time maintaining equilibrium. It often loses, as we all know when we do something we know we shouldn’t but can’t help, and then have to live with the consequences.

But Keppe has re-defined this battle by proposing that our neurosis comes, not from the fight between our primitive instincts and our censoring personal and social Super-Ego, but from our inverted desires against our good, beautiful and true essence. A dilemma recognized by St. Paul when he lamented, “Why do I do the things I don’t want and fail to do the things I want?”

A question perhaps all of us have asked in different ways. Keppe’s work in this area is essential for all, but lamentably not well divulged. Let’s go some ways towards correcting that.

Our Inverted Contra-Ego, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Posted by on April 8, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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Explaining Illness and Epidemics Energetically

I’m Richard Lloyd Jones, and this is Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head. From the time we’re young, we’re taught to protect ourselves from nature. Sprays to keep off the bugs, oils to block the harmful rays, poisonous cleansers to stave off the offending bacteria shacked up in the bathroom.

Nature is a savage place, we’re shown on Cable TV documentaries, where malefic killer diseases lurk and there are microbe enemies in pigs and birds.

It’s so common to hear this that we can be forgiven for not questioning the accuracy of this view. You see, it was a scientific coup d’etat back in the early 1900s that launched us on the path to seeing all our health problems as coming from the microbes invading us from nature. That was Pasteur’s proposal, the Germ Theory was born, and the burgeoning pharmaceutical industry led by Rockefeller and Carnegie had found its scientific forefather. And its tool for bludgeoning contradictory perspectives senseless, and within a very short time, medical education and clinical practice was firmly on the path of seeing our problems in germs, and making billions with medications to protect us from them.

Explaining Illness and Epidemics Energetically, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Posted by on March 28, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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