Man’s Greatest Enemy

I’m Richard Lloyd Jones, and this is Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

All of us, if we’ve lived a little, have had to contend with the lure of temptation. From the mundane, “Just one more piece of chocolate cake,” to the come on of a cold beer when you’ve got a drinking problem, to the more serious attractions to violence and crime, we all know the experience of that voice in our ear.

Our modern scientific perspective prefers evidence-based interventions as solutions, leading us to explain away vice and bad habits as weakness, upbringing, chemical imbalance, even genetic disposition. We seldom in our modern world even think of putting temptation down to influence from nefarious spirits. Reason over superstition would read the promotional literature for the modern point of view.

But are we missing something in excluding the theological view? After all, Jesus warned us time and again of our unhealthy subservience to demons, and perhaps we should listen more carefully to that advice.

Man’s Greatest Enemy, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Certainty of the Divine

I’m Richard Lloyd Jones and this is Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

A belief in immaculate conception, overcoming death with resurrection, divine miracles of creation … modern thinkers complain these tenets suffer from a lack of evidence. “Faith is a great evil,” they say, “That leads gullible human beings to open their minds so much their brains fall out.”

I respectfully disagree. Faith has been shown in studies to mitigate symptoms of depression, spiritual beliefs can help us deal with loss, disease and death, and even aid recovery. We also know that it helps deal with addictions. Great things have been accomplished with perseverance in the face of impossible odds, even at the risk of loss of life, and what is that if not an act of faith?

So just dismissing conviction in something divine simply because there’s not scientific proof seems unintelligent to me. And anyway, if we just look around us at the intricate design of nature, the complex way natural processes mesh together perfectly, we really have to be slightly moronic to rule out divinity.

The Certainty of the Divine, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Women and the Dark Side

A few hundred years ago, the notions of heaven and hell, of God and Lucifer, were respected themes for composers, poets, and painters. Milton’s Paradise Lost contains the idea of Lucifer endeavoring to defeat Christ and regain his former position in paradise. Raphael captured the epic battle where the Archangel Michael vanquished Satan. Beethoven wrote of the desire of man to know God.

And then, somewhere along the way, the devil became largely erased as a factor in popular culture. Any modern educated person who considers the battle between the forces of dark and the forces of light as anything but a mythical allegory is considered … well, not modern today.

But of course, it still persists. The rumors of rock stars making the Faustian bargain still abound, the Rolling Stones had dire repercussions to Sympathy for the Devil at Altamont, and many modern pageants have demonic idolatry built right into their ceremonies.

So I think it’s still relevant. Women and the Dark Side, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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A Trilogical History of Religious Society

Ethics? Principles? Doing unto others? When did they become so old fashioned?

Nowadays we live in a world almost totally dominated by greed, getting something for nothing, and exploitation. Our premise today is that this goes directly against the foundations of our civilization, and our human essence. That’s serious stuff. Law and legislation are totally inadequate for forming a good society. We need the ancient values brought by all the world’s great religions.

Join Richard Lloyd Jones and Dr. Claudia Bernhardt Pacheco on a journey through the Trilogical History of Religion and Society today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

Comments welcome at joneshealing@gmail.com

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Beyond Materialism – A Scientific Look at Christmas

December 15th, 2010
 
Materialism. A worse condition than drug addiction, says Norberto Keppe. Powerful stuff today as we take a scientific look at the true meaning of the season, and our terrible corruption of it … and along the way, re-capture the missing spirit of Christmas.

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The Universe of the Spirits

I remember my college roommate couldn’t sleep for a week after watching The Exorcist. We all have friends who messed around with ouija boards, don’t we? My neighbour used to receive visits from recently departed loved ones in her dreams.

There is a wealth of theological knowledge on the presence and influence of spirits in our day-to-day lives. But sadly, it’s been eliminated. Today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head, we’ll begin to open the doors again to the universe of the spirits. This preceless knowledge has been totally excluded from our modern, so-called rational world.

Norberto Keppe, in exploring the deep psychopathology of human beings, saw very early on in his work that human difficulties were much more spiritual than organic, much more related to the questions of who we are, where we came from, and where we were going than they were to the out-of-whack chemicals in our brains.

But Keppe went a step further even by seeing that the finality of our envy and inversion would be our enormous rejection of reality and God. So he has always kept an ear tuned to the importance of theology in considering the human psyche. His recent book, The Universe of the Spirits, is currently being translated into English, and is a must read for a world totally cut off from this spiritual wisdom and desperately in need of connecting to it again.

I’ve invited my good friend, Cesar Soos, in again to consider this topic with me. Cesar has been researching the metaphysical and spiritual world for many years now, and has a fantastic perspective on Keppe’s wonderful book.

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