Going Beyond the Dogmas of Science

Dogma. A principle or set of principles laid down by an authority as incontrovertibly true. Meaning incapable of being questioned or doubted. In the 15 and 1600s, there was the beginning of a movement against dogma that burst forth from the scientific studies of such giants as Copernicus and Keppler, Newton and Galileo. Names we know well, even if we understand little of their proposals.

But this much we can understand: the scientists of the time were engaged in replacing untestable dogmas with scientific scrutiny and experimentation.

The dogmas they were opposing, or course, were from the religious institutions of the time. Large and powerful churches not opposed to burning or drowning those who disagreed with them. Scientific experimentation, then, was a good thing that helped move us from superstition and irrationality.

But there is a danger as well when experimental science is elaborated independently from the knowledge that was available in the past. It creates another intransigent dogma. We’ll go beyond the dogmas of modern science, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Fathers of our Inverted Science, part 2

Our thinking, our philosophies of life, these are things we take for granted most of the time. “That’s just the way it is,” we say, and we step out confidently upon that premise. But what extensive research in clinical study from Brazil is showing us is that we would do well to investigate a little deeper. Our thinking, as it turns out, is not always our own.

I’m Richard Lloyd Jones, and today in Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head, Fathers of our Inverted Science, part 2.

Last time on our program, Cesar Soós and I began our discussion about the leading thinkers who have had such an impact on our human civilization. And how their mistakes have led us collectively to the mess our modern society finds itself in today. We talked about Aristotle’s monumental error of placing the senses as the determiner of knowledge.

“Nothing comes to the mind which doesn’t pass first through the senses,” he asserted, thereby enshrining sensory, positivistic science as the lord of the domain.

Aristotle’s ideas were resisted for a few centuries, particularly by Augustine, who leaned more towards Plato’s universality, and Anselm. But Aquinas, the great medieval theologian, brought Aristotle back to the forefront, and the battle was on. Francis Bacon, Descartes, Comte followed, and science changed from considering more metaphysical explanations for the origin of things to seeing all phenomena only in terms of their physical characteristics. Left in the wake as well were the moral or theological tenets of science, which thus became strictly materialistic. The Big Bang, the search for the particles that cause gravity or even intelligence and creativity, the destruction of material nature to get energy – all are consequences of this academic difference of opinion.

Right away, we see that philosophy and theology have dramatically influenced science, which does not come solely from experimentation at all, as scientists would have us believe.

Dr. Norberto Keppe‘s Analytical Trilogy is a more advanced science because it accepts the important discoveries and truths from philosophy and theology in its scientific postulates. Dr. Keppe was telling a group of us recently that Analytical Trilogy is a science that accepts and integrates what’s true from all fields. And this is possible because of two things: Keppe’s establishing of a true metaphysics on which to base an analysis of anything, and Keppe’s clarification of what’s going on in the human psyche, which causes us to misinterpret reality and put many inverted ideas into our theories.

This is no small thing, and difficult to explain in entirety, so I encourage you to read Keppe’s work to get a fuller view. Our portal at trilogia.ws will lead you in some interesting directions, and of course, I’m always available to steer you in the right direction at rich@richjonesvoice.com.

On our last program, we showed how Freud and Darwin made crucial errors that have led society and science in the wrong direction totally. Today, I continue my fascinating discussion with Cesar Soós … part 2 of Fathers of the Lie.

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Fathers of our Inverted Science, part 1

The truth will set you free, it is written.

OK, good. But knowing what the truth is, recognizing it when it pulls up alongside, ah, that’s a little more difficult. Especially as our materialistic worldview would tell us that truth depends. And this idea of relative truth is a lie that comes to us from somebody else’s head.

Today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head, the Fathers of the Lie.

If you’ve been tuned in to our program for awhile now, you’ll know that we’re based on the science of Analytical Trilogy, which is trilogical because of its union of philosophy, science and spirituality. And this spiritual part is an important aspect of science that was for all intents and purposes cut out of scientific consideration with the rise of positivistic science in the middle of the 19th century.

Auguste Comte, the father of Positivism, talked about the quest for truth going through 3 phases, with the theological being the first or, we could say, most primitive. The philosophical phase would be next, and the positivist the last, meaning the most mature. And this last phase states that we know the most when we base ourselves on actual sense experience.

Right away, we can find some flaws with this view in that we know many things without having experience. Recent studies at Yale and Berkley suggest that little babies have working knowledge of basic arithmetic and physics principles as well as a well developed moral sense. And all of this with with no previous sensory experience.

So, linking all our societal development to positivistic science bases us not on something superior, but inferior. And we desperately need the amalgamation again of science with philosophy and theology or spirituality, which is precisely what Keppe’s work of Analytical Trilogy does.

More about this expansive work can be found at our Trilogy portal, or write me by email for more information or observations or questions. Always great to hear from you.

Our program today will be the first of two parts exploring how the inferior sensory-based science got so entrenched in our academic institutions – and our society in general. It’s the result of a great lie perpetrated and followed by many great thinkers who were fooled into following the lie. And that lie has been inspired by the supreme liar in the Universe – Lucifer. And that’s why reintroducing the 5000-year wisdom from Judeo-Christian theology is so important. Keppe knows this, and that’s why I consider his science to be the most important science to be studied in the world today.

Cesar Soós, one of our great Keppean metaphysics scholars at the International Society of Analytical Trilogy, is my guest today for the first part of Fathers of the Lie.

Click here to listen to this episode.

Bringing Theology and Philosophy Together with Science

I’m Richard Lloyd Jones, and this is TWSEH.

Oil and water. Black cats and white sweaters. Neckties and bowls of soup. Some things just aren’t made to go together. Like being given plastic cutlery at a Brazilian barbecue restaurant, they’re all a bit difficult to reconcile. Some more profound examples could include faith and doubt, humility and self-confidence. And what about God and science?

Today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head, Bringing Together Theology and Science.

TWSEH proudly streams on the STOP Radio Network, and you can get us there 24/7 in iTunes talk radio stations, or through the free TuneIn app. We’re also available as individual podcasts through iTunes podcasts or wherever fine podcasts are sold. Our sites are stopradio.org and healingthroughconsciousness.com.
This is a prickly subject I’m embarking on here, I’m aware of that. But I feel I would be doing a dis-service if I didn’t address the subject. I say this because of the fundamental questions that can only be addressed if we wade into these controversial waters.

Questions like, what is the origin of life and the universe? What is the purpose of life anyway? And more existential even … why am I here? We can’t begin to tackle these questions without a consideration of today’s topic.

These questions don’t occupy our conversations much these days, if they ever did. The Facebook posts we read seldom broach the existential beyond the collective questioning we embark on after a tragedy occurs or a famous person dies. I was recently visiting my aging parents in Canada and their diminished quality of life has caused no small reflection on my own life and purpose. So there are times when we venture into the reverie that generates this discussion. Although it’s rare. Especially in recent years it appears. We’re not much for the deeper considerations in our materialistic and consumerist society of today, and I don’t think this has been positive. “What’s it all about, Alfie?” seems a faintly anachronistic and old-fashioned question today, doesn’t it?

Or is it that we’re just embarrassed to admit that we ponder those questions, admittedly late at night when no one’s watching? There’s precious little reflection of life’s mysteries in our modern art. The poets and song writers mostly seem intent on considering love only from the “how am I going to live without him or her?” position.

In that light, I just finished reading Leonard Cohen’s biography, and was touched by the deep yearning he has had over his long career to explore the profound and the profane, so I know it’s not completely uncool to pose the deeper questions.
Well, in fact, who cares if it’s uncool to be involved in understanding the human situation. I’m not sure when displaying profundity became unmodern, but I’m all for returning to a time when the artists considered they were conversing with the beyond and a human being wanted to consider his short life as fitting within some larger purpose and design.

In large part, I think what’s going on here is a result of the splitting of science from theology and philosophy over the past 500 years or so – culminating in our 20th Century position that there’s no way to marry the three. Science has become a strictly materialistic pursuit perfectly represented in Einstein’s famous formula – the most famous of the 20th Century – that E=mc2. In other words, no matter, no energy, making Einstein’s theory arguably one of the most materialistic in the history of science. I’m sure that wasn’t his intention, of course, but it’s hard to escape the stark materialism of his proposal.

It’s also difficult to distill a coherent spiritual philosophy from the Quantum Physics camp. Parallel realities. Alternate universes. Unlimited realities awaiting your choice to come into being. How to make sense of that in any practical way? I watched What the Bleep do we Know a couple of times and, I must confess, couldn’t make head or tails of it. It seems sexy to consider that universe a series of possibilities awaiting my choice before unfolding reality, but I somehow can’t quite conclude that reality actually bends to my will despite my wishing it so.

The Architect’s speech from Matrix Reloaded is a classic example of how confused we’ve become by this separation of science and theology. Critics call it “profound” but “confusing”. And it is that. Listen:

“The first matrix was perfect … flawless, sublime. A triumph equaled only by its monumental failure.”

What does that mean? And since when did confusing become profound? No, we need a better starting point than this. A starting place that can be found in the work of Norberto Keppe. His Analytical Trilogy is the synthesis of science, philosophy and theology that has been missing. Keppe considers philosophy to be the mother of science and theology the grandmother, and it’s very illuminating to look at reality through Analytical Trilogy eyes.

Let’s do that today … try to bring the incredible wisdom from 5000 years of theological and philosophical study back into science. Or at least, start the process of understanding that. Keppe’s books will fill out the knowledge. If you’re interested in more, write me at rich@richjonesvoice.com.

Bringing Together Theology and Science, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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Modern Science in Crisis

Any critique of modern science hits up against a formidable wall of skepticism and blind loyalty to the dogma that characterizes the scientific world view today.

That won’t stop us from attempting the task, however.

Because something changed in science. Although scientists today are generally against any idea of a transcendental reality, it wasn’t always like that. For centuries, the greatest geniuses considered the ultimate creative force of God fundamental to understanding of anything.

And then, it all changed. Let’s explore that change, and show how modern scientific dogma has led us to a blind alley that we won’t be able to escape from without reuniting science with theology and philosophy – which is exactly what Norberto Keppe’s Analytical Trilogy does.

Within this critique will also be some fundamental knowledge about the human psyche and its contribution to our problems, and the hopeful possibilities emerging from the Keppe Motor.

Join the conversation at joneshealing@gmail.com

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Energetic Pollution: Destroying Nature and Our DNA

We have a tremendous power inside our minds, but our inverted sense of values causes us to act against goodness all the time. Imagine the collective force of 7 billion people expressing their frustration, anger, arrogance and envy!
That’s big energetic pollution, and it is the root cause of the destruction of our planet today. Our external pollution and poisoning is a direct reflection of that.
This is the fundamental focus of Norberto Keppe’s science of Analytical Trilogy, beautifully explained today by Dr. Claudia Bernhardt Pacheco. Join the discussion. Comments welcome at joneshealing@gmail.com

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The Revolution in Science

As we’ve explored before, it was Aristotle who led the compartmentalizaton of science into all its disciplines. He oriented us away from Plato’s more universal perspective to looking down to the senses for understanding reality.

It was a significant mistake, and in case you’ve never given any thought to how philosophy drives science, strap yourself in. Today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head, The Revolution in Science, prompted by the discoveries of Brazilian/Austrian psychoanalyst and social scientist, Norberto Keppe.

Now this is uncharted territory. Keppe has been working in the field of psychology for decades and has achieved something truly significant. Through his discovery of psychological Inversion, he has been able to finish the mapping of the human psyche.

This is no small feat, of course, and a big statement. But as you begin to delve into Keppe’s theories and clinical examples, you begin to make sense of many previously inexplicable behaviors – in yourself and friends and family members, and even in political and social movements and structures. Reading his book, The Origin of Illness, is a treatise on leading edge psychology and it’s, frankly, light years ahead of anything else in the field.

Keppe’s big discovery of Inversion shows us that human society is upside down. We’ve inverted our values, our economy works against people not for them, our education system trains us to work for corporations, not to think and develop an advanced society.

All this will be explored at our World Conference of Analytical Trilogy, Sept. 24 – 27, 2008. More information on that is available at www.wcatus.org

And our upcoming teleclass series will explore this in much more detail, too. Write me for information on that … rich@richjonesvoice.com

This Inversion also affected Aristotle, and the fathers of modern science, Compte, Descartes, Newton, Einstein. Keppe applies his psychological wisdom to science as well to powerful effect. His book, The New Physics, which is available as a downloadable e-book, puts us right side up again, and it’s the subject of our program today. Keppean researcher, Cesar Soos, joins us.

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