The Tyranny of Cool

Ask them about what’s important to them and they’ll parry your enthusiasm with a nonchalant shrug and a mumbled, “I don’t know.” You can predict it … somewhere between kid-dom and adolescence, your child stops asking inquisitive questions and starts acting like everything you care about and they used to care about is now completely useless.

Today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head, The Tyranny of Cool. How can we understand – and help – our teenagers?

Listen, I know I’m dangerously close to sounding like every other person from the older generation here, lamenting the lost younger generation. But at the risk of sounding like every parent you’ve ever heard, I’m going to go out on a limb and propose that really, today, something is different with our teenagers. I’m open to the consideration that maybe it’s just a matter of degree, but I think something is dreadfully wrong in the soul of our young people.

Of course, we can’t separate that from the corruption in values we’ve witnessed in society, and that process has been aided and abetted by, among others, my generation, so I don’t mean to separate myself from the problem and suggest, “Hey, we were wonderful, what the hell happened to you guys?” I have rather sobering memories of Mrs. Kent coming up to me in the halls after English Lit. class when I was surrounded by my basketball-loving friends and asking me embarrassingly, “Richard, wasn’t Milton´s Paradise Lost wonderful today?” My response was not particularly full of gratitude and enthusiastic agreement.

So, it’s always been somewhat this way. But I still maintain that the adolescents are in worse shape today.

Let’s analyze this a little. Selma Genzani is one of the lead analysts at Norberto Keppe´s Integral Psychoanalysis clinic here in Brazil. She has vast experience with adults, children and, of course, teenagers.

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The Strength of the Weaker Sex

Millions were killed senselessly in the Middle Ages.

They couldn’t vote for decades.

Their bodies sell everything from perfume to piston rings.

They’re our mothers and sisters, bosses and colleagues. And maybe soon, presidents.

They’ve caused wars, and yet are the biggest champions of peace.

And talking about their pathology can get you in some trouble!

Today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head, we’ll explore the strengths of the weaker sex. Of course, calling them that reveals our inversion in considering only the external, considering strength only in the size and amount of muscles.

More in a minute. Just wanted to remind you of our International Congress of Analytical Trilogy coming up next March, 2008, here in Brazil. A perfect opportunity for you to learn more about the work of Norberto Keppe and how Analytical Trilogy can be applied to all areas of human endeavor. Through our Trilogical lens, we’ll be investigating the areas of health and psychosomatics, education, media, psychotherapy, economics, arts, science and metaphysics, ufology, ecology, philosophy, sociopathology, spirituality. It will be a state of the union, so to speak, on where we are in humanity at understanding how the human being works. This goes deep to the root of all our problems, so any of you involved in social activism of any kind, you’ll want to join us to get a handle on the key reasons why we’ve come so unstuck in so many areas all at the same time. And that’s because we’re seeing the impact now of the centuries of inverted human values. Make a note and start planning for the Easter week, Mar. 20 – 23, 2008. Write me if you’re interested, rich@richjonesvoice.com

Our topic today is a hot one. But beautiful in how we can analyze it through Analytical Trilogy. Trilogy, by the way, stands for the union of philosophy, theology and science, or thought, feeling and action in the human being. And it’s necessary to consider all three if we’re to have a complete view of anything. Modern science has cut away the two pillars of philosophy and theology, and so wobbles incompletely on its own trying to make sense of the world and its phenomena, and failing. Without the upward view into the abstraction and consideration of being and spirituality, science condemns itself to a strictly material view, and its incomplete and inadequate conclusions suffer as a result.

Back in the 1990s, Dr. Claudia Pacheco wrote a courageous book called Women on the Couch: An Analysis of Women’s Psychopathology. Some women were not happy. But I found it illuminating in highlighting the problems in relationships and lives of both men and women. And Dr. Pacheco has been developing her views since. Let’s find out the latest, today on Thinking with Somebody Else’s Head.

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